Happiness

We all have our own ideas about what constitutes the state we call ‘happiness’. In philosophy, there are two senses of the term.

One uses ‘happiness’ as a value term, roughly synonymous with well-being or flourishing. The other body of work uses the word as a purely descriptive psychological term, akin to ‘depression’ or ‘tranquility’. An important project in the philosophy of happiness is simply getting clear on what various writers are talking about: what are the important meanings of the term and how do they connect? While the “well-being” sense of happiness receives significant attention in the contemporary literature on well-being, the psychological notion is undergoing a revival as a major focus of philosophical inquiry, following on recent developments in the science of happiness….

Philosophers who write about “happiness” typically take their subject matter to be either of two things, each corresponding to a different sense of the term:

  1. A state of mind
  2. A life that goes well for the person leading it

On the other hand we have ‘unhappiness’ and the different meanings and causes for that state of mind or being.

Ergo, stones are the source of unhappiness and not-stones are behind happiness.

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